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BUILDING A COMMUNITY: Informing Nevada

 

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Nevada PEP E-Communique

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Adaptive Recreation Programs
Aging and Disability Resource Centers
The Arc
Assistive Technology Improving Access
Autism Resources for Families
Best Buddies
Bookshare®
Boys and Girls Clubs of America
Boys Town
Centers for Independent Living
What are Charter Schools?
Children's Advocacy Alliance
Consumer Health Assistance
Contacting my National Legislative Officials
How do Deaf Centers help Nevadans?
Disability Resource Centers in NV's Colleges
Down Syndrome Organizations
Early Learning
Finding Low Cost Medical Equipment
Head Start and Early Head Start
Learning about LEND
Families Get Involved in Legislative Session
Summer Time is Library Time!
Museums in Nevada
What is Mobile Crisis?
National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI)
National Federation of the Blind
How Do I Contact my National Legislative Officials
Nevada State Public Charter School Authority
How does the Office for a Safe and Respectful Learning Environment Help Families?
What are Post-Secondary College Programs?
Program for Infants & Toddlers w/ Disabilities
Protection and Advocacy Centers
Public Broadcasting Helps Families
Respite
Scouting Builds Skills for an Inclusive Community
Shriners Hospital
Special Olympics
State Advisory Panels
Suicide Prevention
How is United Way helping the Community?

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Adaptive Recreation Programs

Adaptive Recreation programs provide a wide range of recreational, social and educational programs for youth and adults with disabilities. In Nevada, the cities of Reno, Henderson and Las Vegas offer classes, outings, camps and recreational sports that in many instances teach skills in a relaxed fun environment. Some programs allow families to use respite funds for program payments. Respite is short term care and is designed to give families a break. It is usually funded through a regional center or ADRC (Aging and Disability Resource Center. Ask the program how they provide accommodations for individuals with disabilities so they can participate in all of recreational center's classes and programs. Programs must utilize certified recreational therapists and follow national standards for therapeutic recreation.


For more information and schedules of activities in Las Vegas, visit
Click HERE . . .

Henderson, visit
Click HERE . . .

Reno, visit
Click HERE . . .

 


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Aging and Disability Resource Centers

Nevada's Care Connection Aging and Disability Resource Centers are a no wrong door, single point of entry into the long term services and supports system. The philosophy of the ADRC program is to make sure consumers and their families have accurate information about their choices in their communities and can easily access programs and benefits for which they qualify.

Nationally, ADRC programs have taken important steps towards meeting Administration on Aging and Center for Medicare and Medicaid's vision by:






Creating a person-centered, community-based environment that promotes independence and dignity for individuals
Providing easy access to information and one-on-one counseling to assist consumers in exploring a full range of long-term support options
Providing resources and services that support the needs of family caregivers.

To learn more about ADRC Read More HERE . . .



The following are the ADRC sites in Nevada.

ADRC - Southern NV East Valley Family Services 702-476-8897

ADRC - Northern NV Dayton Senior Center 775-246-6210

Fernley Senior Center 775-575-3370

Lyon County Human Services 775-577-5009

Ron Wood Resource Center 775-884-2269

To learn more about Nevada's Aging and Disability Resource Centers visit:
www.nevadaadrc.com



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The Arc

The Arc in Nevada is working to develop long-term capacity for advocates to have input and impact on issues of importance to people with developmental disabilities and their families. As a chapter organization,The Arc in Nevada encourages collaboration with other community stakeholders and advocates to provide resources and develop advocacy skills. On a national basis it is the largest community-based organization advocating for and serving people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families. They encompass all ages and all spectrums from autism, Down syndrome, Fragile X and various other developmental disabilities. Nationally, services in many states may include early intervention, supported employment, job training, transition planning, respite care, supported living and transportation to name a few.

For more information on national The Arc, visit:
http://www.thearc.org/what-we-do/programs-and-services

To learn more about The Arc in Nevada visit http://www.thearcnevada.org


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Assistive Technology Improving Access

National Assistive Technology Technical Assistance Partnership (NATTAP) The 56 state and territory programs are funded under the Assistive Technology Act of 1998, as amended. State Assistive Technology Act programs work to improve the provision of assistive technology to individuals with disabilities of all ages through comprehensive statewide programs of technology-related assistance. Additionally, the programs support activities designed to maximize the ability of individuals with disabilities and their family members, guardians, and advocates to access and obtain assistive technology devices and services. Key Activities of Assistive Technology Projects are:

    • Device Loan Programs
    • Device Reutilization Programs
    • Device Demonstration Programs
    • State Financing Activities

Nevada's assistive technology project is called The Nevada Special Education Technology Assistance Project (NSETAP) and was established by the Special Education Branch of the Nevada Department of Education. The Project's purpose is to provide resources to school districts for making informed decisions regarding assistive technology devices and/or services which meet state and federal mandates.

The Project provides a range of services to education agencies, parents, and the professionals that serve students with disabilities. Read more about the services the project provides, Click HERE . . .



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Autism Resources for Families

Nationally, since 1965, the Autism Society in partnership with our over 100 local and state affiliates has supported millions of individuals and families impacted by autism. The Autism Society envisions individuals and families living with autism are able to maximize their quality of life, are treated with the highest level of dignity, and live in a society in which their talents and skills are appreciated and valued.

In Northern NV
The Northern NV chapter, of the Autism Society has been in operation since 1993. The local chapter helps support regional groups who assist Northern Nevada Autism families, by distributing donation funds and information. Another northern NV resource is the Just In Hope Foundation that provides information and support to families who have a child with autism.

In Southern NV
Families for Effective Autism Treatment. (FEAT) is a non-profit organization of parents and professionals, designed to help families with children who have received the diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). They provide support, encouragement, and guidance to parents and create an opportunity for them to benefit from contact with other parents with similar needs and concerns. Another resource, Grant a Gift Autism Foundation is a non-profit organization helping children, youth and their families fight Autism by providing diagnostic and treatment funding, support services, vocational training, transition planning, and education.

In Elko NV
Northern Nevada Autism Network was established in 2005 to help families in Elko County affected by autism. The goal of Northern Nevada Autism Network is to increase autism awareness and access to treatment.



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Boys and Girls Clubs of America

For more than a century, Boys & Girls Clubs have helped put young people on the path to great futures. Learn more about their mission to provide an inclusive environments for a diverse group of employees, volunteers and Club members, where opportunities and equal access are demonstrated at all levels. Click on the links below to learn more from each site on how children with disabilities can benefit from their inclusive environments and participate in Boys and Girls Club activities in Nevada.

Boys and Girls Club of Truckee Meadows (Northern NV)
Boys and Girls Club of Southern NV
Boys and Girls Club of Elko
Boys and Girls Club of Laughlin
Boys and Girls Club of Western NV (Carson City)
Boys and Girls Club of Winnemucca


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Best Buddies


Founded in 1989 by Anthony K. Shriver, Best Buddies is a vibrant, international organization that has grown from one original chapter to almost 1,700 middle school, high school, and college chapters worldwide. Best Buddies programs engage participants in each of the 50 United States, and in 50 countries around the world.

To learn more about the national organization Click HERE

In five short years, Best Buddies Nevada has educated and informed thousands of school-age children through assemblies and one-to-one meetings with educators and families about the Best Buddies movement. There are untold numbers of youth poised to befriend their peers with disabilities. Beyond school-based programs, our participants are supported in developing friendships through our adult friendship program. The mission of Best Buddies is to establish a global volunteer movement that creates opportunities for one-to-one friendships, integrated employment and leadership development for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

To learn more about their statewide programs for Nevada, Click HERE . . .

 


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What is Bookshare®?

We're Experiencing Expotential Growth at Bookshare!

Bookshare® provides the world’s largest online library of accessible reading materials for people with print disabilities. Individuals can sign up for membership and access the library on their own. Organizations that serve individuals with print disabilities (schools, libraries, community centers, etc.) can sign up and provide access to their students or clients. A Bookshare membership offers unlimited access to accessible books, textbooks, newspapers and magazines. Additionally, free access to technology makes it easy to read books with a computer.

Through an award from the U.S. Department of Education Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), Bookshare offers free memberships to U.S. schools and qualifying
U.S. students. Contact your child's school for more information
on how to get started or Click HERE . . . for more information.

 


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What is Boys Town?

Since 1917, Boys Town’s mission has been to give at-risk children and families the love, support and education they need to succeed. Because we firmly believe that regardless of background and circumstances, every child and every family has the potential to thrive. To learn more click on the national Boys Town website. Watch the video to see how Boys Town mission as been helping at risk children and families for nearly a century.

Boys Town Nevada
Boys Town Nevada opened its doors in 1991, bringing an innovative approach to child and family care to those in need in the Las Vegas area. Their mission is: Changing the way America cares for children, families and communities by providing and promoting an Integrated Continuum of Care® that instills Boys Town values to strengthen body, mind and spirit. To learn more about the programs in Nevada click here

 


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Centers for Independent Living

Centers for independent living (CILs) are private, nonprofit corporations that provide services to maximize the independence of individuals with disabilities and the accessibility of the communities they live in. According to the National Center On Independent Living, CIL's serve all ages. Centers are funded in part by the Department of Education, Rehabilitation Services Administration, Independent Living Branch, to provide, among other things, several core services:

  ► Advocacy
  ► Independent living skills training
  ► Information and referral
  ► Peer counseling

Southern Nevada Centers for Independent Living
2950 S. Rainbow Blvd. Suite 220
Las Vegas, NV 89146
Phone: 702-889-4216
Toll Free: (800) 870-7003
Fax: (702) 889-4574

Northern Nevada Centers for Independent Living
999 Pyramid Way
Sparks, NV 89431
Phone: 775-353-3599
Fax: 775-353-3588

To learn more about Nevada’s Centers for Independent Living click here nncil.org or www.sncil.org.



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Children's Advocacy Alliance

The Children’s Advocacy Alliance (CAA) is a community-based nonprofit organization that mobilizes people, resources and reason to ensure every child has a chance to thrive and to make Nevada a better place to live and raise a family.

CAA advocates for the well-being of Nevada’s Children. They bring people together to build consensus around priorities and to leverage our collective strength toward real changes in policy and practice. The organization collects, analyzes and shares research and information with people who make decisions impacting Nevada’s children and families. They believe in building public will through education, outreach, and advocacy to solve expansive and chronic problems facing kids and families.
To learn more, visit their website.

Since 2000, the Children’s Advocacy Alliance has painted the picture of Nevada children by gathering and publicizing information on child well-being indicators through the Nevada Children’s Report Card.The purpose of the report card is to provide a general understanding of how we, as a state, are taking care of our children. The CAA uses the data gathered in the report card to assist in educating policy makers and the general public about efforts needed in our state to support and improve services for children and families. To view the 2014 report card click here.


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What is Consumer Health Assistance?

The Affordable Care Act provides consumers with significant new protections, including the ability to appeal decisions by plans to deny coverage of needed services and select an available primary care provider of their choosing.

As part of the law, Center for Consumer Information and Oversight is helping consumers appeal health plan decisions, understand the Consumer Assistance Program, and more easily understand and evaluate their health insurance choices. For more information click here

In Nevada, the Governor’s Office for Consumer Health Assistance (GovCHA), established in 1999, has become a central and pivotal point for information and resources for Nevada consumers, physicians and other health care providers, and insurers. Through the Patient Protection Affordable Care Act of 2010, other states have developed their own consumer health assistance offices, and have sought guidance from Nevada as a model program. Nevada’s Consumer Assistance Program was established to assist consumers with access to healthcare, questions about insurance, disputes with insurance companies or difficulty navigating complex, multilayered health and social service systems. GovCHA acts as a central resource point to help consumers access state, local, community health care and social service systems. To learn more, download the English or Spanish brochure.


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Disability Resource Centers in Nevada's Colleges

More and more high school students with disabilities are planning to continue their education in postsecondary schools, including vocational and career schools, two- and four- year colleges, and universities. Both students and parents will find it important to be well informed about students' rights and responsibilities as well as the postsecondary schools responsibilities. Often they are called Disability Resource Centers. To learn more about these rights and responsibilities Click Here . . . All colleges that receive federal funds are required to have a office that responds to requests for accommodations.

In Nevada, the following colleges have Disability Resource Centers and they encourage students to visit their center during their admissions or school visit to find out more about their services.

University of Nevada Las Vegas: http://drc.unlv.edu/
University of Nevada Reno: www.unr.edu/drc
Nevada State College: NSC Accommodations
Truckee Meadows College: http://www.tmcc.edu/drc/
College of Southern Nevada: https://www.csn.edu/pages/544.asp

 


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Down Syndrome Organizations

The mission of the National Down Syndrome Society is to be the national advocate for the value, acceptance and inclusion of people with Down syndrome. The NDSS National Policy Center was founded in 2005 as the NDSS advocacy arm to support our mission to be the national advocate for the value, acceptance and inclusion of people with Down syndrome. Our National Policy Center facilitates and mobilizes advocacy efforts for federal, state, and local policies that positively impact people with Down syndrome across the country.
- Read More . . .

Southern Nevada
The mission of the Down Syndrome Organization of Southern Nevada is to enlighten the public by promoting a positive understanding of Down syndrome in the community and be a source of support, information and education for families and individuals affected by Down syndrome.
- Read More . . .

Northern Nevada
Our mission is to create a positive understanding of Down syndrome. We provide events, information, education and awareness as we advocate for full community inclusion of people with Down syndrome and their families.
- Read More . . .

 




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Finding Low Cost Medical Equipment and Supplies in Nevada

Sometimes it can seem impossible to find funding for a piece of adaptive equipment that you know will vastly enrich and enhance your child's life. Check out these organizations and helpful guide as you search, Funding Adaptive Mobility Equipment for Young Children with Disabilities.

Southern NV
Little Ms Hannah Foundation gives parents the necessary tools and financial assistance to empower them to meet their child’s unique medical and lifestyle needs, as well as provide support resources and special attention for their other children. To apply for medical and therapy equipment grants, Click Here . . .

Northern NV
CARE Chest of Sierra Nevada is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that provides free medical equipment, supplies, prescription assistance and wellness education to Northern Nevadans in need. To apply for medical supplies and equipment, Click Here . . .

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Early Learning

U. S. Department of Education - Early Learning Initiatives
Early Learning at ED

The goal for early learning is to improve the health, social-emotional, and cognitive outcomes for all children from birth through 3rd grade, so that all children, particularly those with high needs and or disabilities, are on track for graduating from high school college- and career-ready. ED is engaged in many efforts to strengthen the quality and availability of early learning programs, here are a few of the key early learning initiatives.

Nevada Department of Education - The Office of Early Learning and Development The focus of the Office of Early Learning and Development is to coordinate birth-3rd grade state level work in collaboration with the Nevada Early Childhood Advisory Council and to improve access and quality of early childhood programs across a variety of settings. The office coordinates state level P-3 reform efforts, which are part of a national initiative to transform how children ages 0 to 8 learn. Check out the Early Childhood Special Education Information Hub that helps parents and professionals learn about best practices and resources for students with disabilities and their families.

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Head Start and Early Head Start


Head Start and Early Head Start programs promote school readiness for economically disadvantaged children by enhancing their social and cognitive development through the provision of educational, health, nutritional, social and other services. Head Start programs serve children ages 3-5 and their families. Early Head Start programs serve pregnant women and children birth to 3 and their families. The federal Office of Head Start (OHS) provides grants to operate both Head Start and Early Head Start programs directly to public and private agencies in Nevada. Programs engage parents in their children's learning and help them in making progress toward their educational, literacy and employment goals. Significant emphasis is placed on the involvement of parents in the administration of local Head Start programs. Click here to find a Head Start near you. Learn more about Head Start in Nevada which is located within the Nevada Department of Education by clicking here.

Head Start regulations require that at least 10 percent of enrolled children are children with disabilities. Each Head Start program is responsible for establishing selection criteria and may include children with disabilities from families that have incomes above the Poverty Guidelines, in addition to enrolling children from families with incomes below the Poverty Guidelines. To learn more how children with disabilities are included in Head Start Programs, click here.

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How do Deaf Centers help Nevadans?


Deaf Centers of Nevada strives to empower and enhance the quality of life for all Deaf and Hard of Hearing individuals through our three main areas of focus.
1.
2.
3.

Support individuals to attain independent living.
Strive for equal communication access in all aspects of daily life.
Provide educational outreach through community events and social service advocacy programs.

Deaf Centers of NV recently was awarded a grant through the Aging and Disability Services Division to provide Communication Services to be funded with “the telecommunication device for the deaf” surcharge through the Public Utilities Commission (PUC) for State Fiscal Year (SFY) 2017. The purpose of the funds are to provide access to statewide services (previously called advocacy services), equipment and assistive technology, training related to equipment, and information and referral regarding resources in the community, for persons who are culturally Deaf, late-deafened, deaf-blind, hard of hearing, and persons with speech disabilities. In addition, with the passage of legislative bill, AB200, emphasis was placed on increasing access to education, employment and health and social services for consumers of the program. These services empower individuals to gain or maintain a level of independence, while influencing individuals to achieve their highest level of self-sufficiency. The program also provides information to state and local entities about communication disabilities and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).
To learn more about Deaf Centers of Nevada's growth plan and expansion in Las Vegas and Reno visit the Deaf Centers of NV facebook page.

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How do I Contact my National Legislative Officials?

House of Representatives - There are 4 congressional districts serving the state of Nevada. Each district has an elected congressman that serves a specific geographical area and population. If families are interested in contacting their Congressman to provide feedback on an issue or register a concern, they can click on the Find My Representative to determine who their Congressman is for the district that they live in. Each congressman has a Washington DC office as well as an office in Nevada.

Senate - Nevada as two Senators, Senator Dean Heller and Senator Harry Reid. You can contact them by clicking on the following link Senators of the 113th Congress. Each senator has an office in Washington DC and in Nevada.

Legislative offices offer constituent services such as purchasing a flag, help with a federal agency, resources or information on visiting Washington DC. Families can also provide information to the staff and or the legislator about the needs of persons with disabilities and how a particular legislation may impact or improve services. Click here for tips when contacting legislative officials.


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Learning about LEND


Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND) programs are a national project that provides long-term, graduate level interdisciplinary training. The purpose is to improve the health of infants, children, and adolescents with disabilities. They accomplish this by preparing trainees from diverse professional disciplines to assume leadership roles in their respective fields and by insuring high levels of interdisciplinary clinical competence. LEND

There are currently 43 LENDs in 37 states. They work together to address national issues of importance to children with special health care needs and their families, exchange best practices and develop shared products.

While each LEND program is unique, they also share the following objectives:

1.


2.



3.


4.

advancing the knowledge and skills of all child health professionals to improve health care delivery systems for children with developmental disabilities;

providing high-quality interdisciplinary education that emphasizes the integration of services from state and local agencies and organizations, private providers, and communities;

providing health professionals with skills that foster community-based partnerships; and

promoting innovative practices to enhance cultural competency, family-centered care, and interdisciplinary partnerships.

In Nevada, NvLEND is housed at University of Nevada Reno at (Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities). Trainees are selected who show promise to assume leadership roles. For the NvLEND, each year 12 trainees will be recruited (typically one from each discipline). The trainees will participate in 104 hours of didactic training, 96 hours of clinical experiences, and 110 hours on a leadership project. To learn more about NvLEND, click here


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How Can Families Get Involved in the Upcoming Legislative Session?

Children need caring adults in their life to help make decisions about their future. Those adults include parents, grandparents, child care providers, teachers, education administrators, business owners and the community at large. Each group has a stake in our future generation and can become advocates for children. By getting involved you can influence public policies that support children in a variety of ways.

The 79th (2017) Session of the Nevada Legislature will begin on Monday, February 6, 2017. Using this search engine constituents can find out who their legislators are that represent your district or your child's school - Which Legislator Represents My ... ?

Learning about the Bill Draft Requests (BDR) can help you become informed about what is being proposed. Your input can and should shape legislation for Nevada. Make your voice heard by contacting your legislator and possibly testifying at a hearing. Tips for Giving Your Testimony handout may be helpful in preparing your testimony. Your testimony can make a difference in whether a bill is passed or put to rest.

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Summer Time is Library Time!


As the temperature heats up families may find the library a cooler place where books live and families can find many free activities. To accommodate persons with disabilities, libraries call on The American Library Association to provide American with Disabilities Act guidance and awareness. The American Library Association (ALA) is the oldest and largest library association in the world, providing association information, news, events, and advocacy resources for members, librarians, and library users. A Division of the ALA is The Association of Specialized and Cooperative Library Agencies which publishes a Library Services for People with Disabilities Policy to help libraries follow Disability laws. Families that have questions can check out Universal Access: Making Library Resources Accessible to People with Disabilities

In Nevada...
Las Vegas-Clark County Library District will provides assistive equipment, services and materials for individuals with disabilities and, upon request, will provide reasonable accommodation to ensure equal access to its programs, services and activities.
Washoe County Libraries offers an Adaptive Technology Series that families can access by using the workstations to determine if this type of assistive technology is helpful.

Visit your library today to see how libraries are committed to offer access and include persons with disabilities in their programs.


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What is Mobile Crisis?

Many states like Nevada are looking at alternatives to emergency room visits and/or hospitalization for youth that are having a psychiatric crisis. Check out this national article from SAMHSA that discusses how mobile crisis teams can provide an effective and timely response.

Nevada has established Mobile Crisis Response Teams in Northern and Southern Nevada areas to respond to families that need crisis intervention and stabilization services for youth under 18. For more information on how to contact Mobile Response Crisis Teams, click on Reno and Las Vegas brochures.


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National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI)


NAMI is the National Alliance on Mental Illness, the nation’s largest grassroots mental health organization dedicated to building better lives for the millions of Americans affected by mental illness. NAMI advocates for access to services, treatment, supports and research and is steadfast in its commitment to raise awareness and build a community for hope for all of those in need. NAMI is the foundation for hundreds of NAMI State Organizations, NAMI Affiliates and volunteer leaders who work in local communities across the country to raise awareness and provide essential and free education, advocacy and support group programs. To read more about NAMI Click Here To watch a brief video on NAMI, Click Here

About NAMI Southern Nevada...
NAMI, the acronym for the National Alliance on Mental Illness, is a grass roots education, support and advocacy organization dedicated to improving the lives of those touched by mental illness. This includes the consumers diagnosed with a mental illness, immediate family, relatives and friends, mental health professionals, and all who share NAMI's vision and mission. To learn more about NAMI Southern Nevada, visit their website Click Here

NAMI Southern Nevada is the area's voice on mental illness. Their mission is to:

    • Support people with mental illnesses and their families by helping them find
      coping mechanisms for their daily struggle with brain disorders.
    • Educate people who have mental illness, their families, and the general public
      about mental illness with the goal of dispelling ignorance and stigma.
    • Advocate for more research and an improved system of mental health services
      across the nation.

About NAMI Northern Nevada...
NNNAMI, Northern Nevada National Alliance on Mental Illness, is the state’s largest grassroots mental health nonprofit. To learn more about this non-profit group, Click HERE . . .

About NAMI Western Nevada...
NAMI Western Nevada serves Carson City, Douglas County and rural counties in Nevada. For more information Click HERE . . .

 


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National Federation of the Blind

The National Federation of the Blind (NFB) is the oldest, largest, and most influential nationwide membership organization of blind people in the United States. Founded in 1940, the NFB advocates for the civil rights and equality of blind Americans, and develops innovative education, technology, and training programs to provide the blind and those who are losing vision with the tools they need to become independent and successful. The National Federation of the Blind is doing this by providing public education about blindness, information and referral services, scholarships, literature and publications about blindness, aids and appliances and other adaptive equipment for the blind, advocacy services and protection of civil rights, employment assistance and support services, development and evaluation of technology, and support for blind persons and their families. Nevada has statewide affiliates in Henderson, Las Vegas and Reno that help families find resources and information. To learn more about the national NFB visit their website at www.nfb.org/about-the-nfb

NFB Nevada can be accessed at www.nfbnevada.org

 


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What is the Nevada State Public Charter School Authority?

Charter Schools in Nevada are public schools funded by the state. Charter Schools are set up by a committee with the desire to provide an educational option for families that meets their child's needs. Currently the Nevada State Public Charter School Authority (SPCSA) is the only sponsor accepting applications for new charter schools. The SPCSA Governing Board (GB) has adopted standards from the National Charter School Resource Center to ensure these schools are held to high standards and serve students in the best possible manner. There is no charge to attend a charter school although there may be a fee for certain specific items or events. Charter schools must be in a traditional "brick and mortar" building or provide "distance education". The responsibility to make a free appropriate public education (FAPE) available to all students with disabilities applies to all public schools including charter schools under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The Facts on Charter Schools and Students with Disabilities can help families understand how charter schools provide services and assist them as they make school decisions.

Parents can view a charter school list by clicking on Nevada Charter School list. Click on Parent Resources section and check out information on questions to ask, school performance rating and a resource entitled What to do If I Have a Problem?

 


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What are Charter Schools?


Nevada Charter Schools are public schools funded by the state. As public schools, charter schools have the opportunity and obligation to serve students with disabilities. Nevada Charter School Association provides a myths and facts list to help parents understand charter schools. The responsibility to make a Free and Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) available to all students with disabilities applies to all public schools including charter schools under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The Facts on Charter Schools and Students with Disabilities can help families understand how charter schools provide services and assist families as they make school decisions. Click here to view the Nevada Department of Education Charter School List. Click on Parent Resources section and check out questions to ask, school performance rating and a resource entitled What to do If I Have a Problem?

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What are Post-Secondary College Programs?


More students with intellectual disabilities are finding opportunities to attend college as their families are demonstrating high expectations and recognizing the importance to continue building skills after high school.
Often families are looking for different ways to increase self determination, self-advocacy and independent living skills in inclusive settings. For more information check out the I want to go to College Video.

Think College provides a model, resources, training and information to support the growth of Post Secondary College Programs across the nation. States that are interested in developing programs utilize the Think College website resources as a guide to establish and build these programs. Think College is at the Institute for Community Inclusion, UMASS Boston serves as the National Coordinating Center for 27 TPSID model demonstration projects. To read more about the promising practices that were observed in 5 state programs and seemed to have a positive effect on student outcomes, check out PROFILES AND PROMISING PRACTICES IN HIGHER EDUCATION FOR STUDENTS WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY.

Nevada has two programs that accept individuals with Intellectual Disabilities and are based on the Think College model and practices.

Northern Nevada - Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities Program Path to Independence which is located at University of Nevada-Reno campus Path to Independence is an NCED program through the Extended Studies Department at UNR. The program began in 2013 with one student in fall semester 2013. In fall semester 2014, one more students were added. View this video for more information about the pilot project and their first student.

Southern Nevada - Project F.O.C.U.S. (Forming Occupational and Community Understanding for Success) which is located at University of Nevada-Las Vegas campus. This program started with their first student in September 2014. Visit their website for more information.

Their mission is:
The purpose of Project F.O.C.U.S. is to provide an inclusive, accessible, and productive career education program for college aged students with Intellectual Disabilities in the Las Vegas valley that promotes self-determination, community engagement and partnerships, job readiness and transitions to adulthood through person-centered planning, inclusive teaching, evidence-based research, and positive behavior supports.


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Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities

If families are concerned about their infant or toddler's development, or suspect that their little one has a disability, services from early intervention provider can help a child learn many key skills to help meet their developmental milestones. The Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities, Part C of IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act), is a federal grant program that assists states in operating a comprehensive statewide program of early intervention services for infants and toddlers with disabilities, ages birth through age 2 years, and their families. In order for a state to participate in the program it must assure that early intervention will be available to every eligible child and its family. The federal law, IDEA Part C, requires states including Nevada to provide quality services that meet the individual needs of eligible infants and toddlers. To find out more about services from Nevada Early Intervention or a local community provider Click HERE . . .


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Protection and Advocacy Centers

The Protection and Advocacy (P&A) System and Client Assistance Program (CAP) comprise the nationwide network of congressionally mandated, legally based disability rights agencies. A P&A/CAP agency exists in every U.S. state and territory.

Nevada has a Protection and Advocacy group that is known as Nevada Disability Law and Advocacy Center. This statewide center is a private non-profit organization that serves as Nevada's federally-mandated protection and advocacy system for human, legal, and service rights for individuals with disabilities.

To learn more visit their website...

http://www.ndalc.org/


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Public Broadcasting Helps Families

PBS is a private, nonprofit corporation, founded in 1969, whose members are America’s public TV stations -- noncommercial, educational licensees that operate more than 350 PBS member stations and serve all 50 states, Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam and American Samoa.

PBS’ mission is to create content that educates, informs and inspires. To do this, PBS offers programming that expands the minds of children,documentaries that open up new worlds, non-commercialized news programs that keep citizens informed on world events and cultures and programs that expose America to the worlds of music, theater, dance and art.

In Northern Nevada, PBS offers families lots of information on developmental milestones, parenting tips, education and community event information. Click on www.knpb.org/


In Southern Nevada, Vegas PBS provides many educational services and works collaboratively with Clark County School District to support student learning. Vegas PBS has a Described and Captioned Media Center (DCMC) which is a free-loan educational media library for all Nevada residents with visual and hearing impairments. It offers many services that most traditional libraries do not, including: braille printing services, audio and braille books – many of which are Newbery and Caldecott Award winners – and educational puzzles and games for deaf, hard-of-hearing, blind, and visually impaired students. Also available on loan are descriptive DVDs and VHS tapes for blind and visually impaired children, as well as closed captioned DVDs and VHS tapes for children who are deaf and hard of hearing. To learn more about this services click here www.vegaspbs.org/dcmc/


 


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How does the Office for a Safe and Respectful Learning Environment Help Families?

This office was created in 2015 and is housed within the Nevada Department of Education. The mission of the Office for a Safe and Respectful Learning Environment is to train, empower, educate, collaborate, advocate and intervene in order to ensure that every student in Nevada, regardless of any differing characteristic or interest feels fully protected physically, emotionally, and socially. If a family does not feel that the district has addressed a bullying incident, they can file a formal complaint with the Nevada Department of Education. To learn more, about bullying visit the Bully Free Zone Visit the National School Climate Centers and stopbullying.gov to learn about Safe School Centers in other states and national efforts to stop bullying.

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What is Respite?


Respite care is temporary relief care designed for families of children or adults with special needs. Respite care can range from a few hours of care provided on a one-time basis to overnight or extended care sessions. Families who have a child with a developmental delay or an intellectual disability can contact their local regional center and apply for respite services. There can be a waiting list for these services.
Click on the following links for other respite services:
Southern NV
Positively Kids
Easter Seals
Olive Crest
FEAT Rest and Relax (R+R)
Northern NV
Rave Family Center
Rural
Rural Respite Program
Military Families
Children's Cabinet

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Scouting Builds Skills for an Inclusive Community

Girl Scouts of the USA and its local councils and troops value diversity and inclusiveness and do not discriminate. Learn about the long history of providing opportunities for girls with disabilities to be a Girl Scout and the benefits of learning with their peers. Girl Scouts of Southern NV and Girl Scouts of the Sierra Nevada are dedicated to inspire through the mission of building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place.

The Boy Scouts of America is one of the nation's largest and most prominent values-based youth development organizations, providing programs for young people that build character, trains them in the responsibilities of participating citizenship and develops personal fitness. Check out the Disability Awareness resources to learn more how boys with disabilities are included in Boy Scouts. Click here to learn more Nevada Area Council in Reno and Boy Scouts of America Las Vegas.


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Shriners Hospital

Shriners Hospitals for Children has a mission to:







Provide the highest quality care to children with neuromusculoskeletal conditions, burn injuries and other special healthcare needs within a compassionate, family-centered and collaborative care environment.
Provide for the education of physicians and other healthcare professionals.
Conduct research to discover new knowledge that improves the quality of care and quality of life of children and families.

For more information, visit their website.

In Southern NV
The Zelzah Shrine Outreach Clinic is dedicated to servicing local Southern Nevada children by providing free medical outreach clinics through out the year. After being evaluated in the clinic, children are transported to Los Angeles, California for orthopedic medical care or cleft lip/palate repair. Visit their website for more information or assistance in making an appointment.

In Northern NV
Kerak Shrine in Reno, NV is part of the system that operates 22 hospitals, all with one objective: To provide the very best medical care for children under 18 years of age, free of charge to the patient. Our burns hospitals are second to none. Boston, Cincinnati, Galveston and of course Northern California in Sacramento. The level of expertise is so high burned children in northern Nevada and much of California will be flown directly to Sacramento California regardless of the geographical point of injury. For more information on how to obtain Shriners medical care,
click here.


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Special Olympics

Reaching over 4.2 million individuals with a disability, Special Olympics spreads compassion and acceptance in a way that can unite the world. Our goal is to awaken everyone -- and every community -- to each person’s common humanity. Understanding brings acceptance; acceptances bring peace. This vision of inclusion starts at the local level. It's expanding on a global scale. Special Olympics does this through a wide range of trainings, competitions, health screenings and fund-raising events. We also create opportunities for families, community members, local leaders, businesses, law enforcement, celebrities, dignitaries and others to band together to change attitudes and support athletes.

Click HERE, for more information about the worldwide programs . . .

In Nevada, Special Olympics Nevada is dedicated to providing free sports training and competition in a variety of Olympic-style sports for children and adults with developmental disabilities. We exist to give our athletes year-round opportunities to develop physical fitness, demonstrate courage, experience joy and share gifts, skills and friendships. Sports training and competitions are offered in several areas in Nevada with 12 sports offered. For more information about Click HERE, for Nevada programs. . .

Click HERE, to learn about the upcoming Nevada summer games. . .

 


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What are State Advisory Panels?

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) requires that each State establish and maintain an advisory panel for the purpose of advising the State special education staff regarding the education of eligible children with disabilities. Federal regulations define the responsibilities of State Advisory Panels as follows:

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Advise the State of unmet needs in the education of children with disabilities.
Comment publicly on any rules or regulations proposed by the State regarding the education of children with disabilities.
Provide advice to the State staff in developing evaluations and reporting on data to the Secretary of Education.
Advise the State in developing corrective action plans to address findings identified in Federal monitoring.
Advise the State in developing and implementing policies relating to the coordination of services for children with disabilities.
Review all final due process officer findings and decisions

Nevada's State Advisory Panel is called Special Education Advisory Committee (SEAC). Parents and professionals are among the required members. To learn more about the committee's work, visit Nevada Department of Education SEAC webpage.


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Suicide Prevention


The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention is the national leader in the fight against suicide. They are the project that funds research, offer educational programs, advocate for public policy, and support those affected by suicide. To learn more, visit their website. Thousands of AFSP Suicide Prevention Advocates across the country are working to shape state and local policies aimed at reducing the number of people who die by suicide. Nevada is one of four states in the United States with a dedicated office to provide information, training and resource as shown on the Statewide Suicide Prevention Initiatives map.

Nevada's Office of Suicide Prevention has offices located in Reno and Las Vegas. The Office of Suicide Prevention has collaborated with partners statewide to draft the Nevada suicide prevention plan. This plan is modeled after the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention, which is maintained by the national Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration of the federal Department of Health and Human Services. Check out the handout What Can Parents Do to Prevent Youth Suicide? to learn more about helping youth that may be considering suicide. To learn more about their resources and partners in Nevada suicide prevention, click here to visit their website. The website encourages families to visit National Suicide Prevention Lifeline to obtain, apps, safety plans and other resources to help them respond to warning signs and risk factors.


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How is United Way helping the Community?

United Way Worldwide advances the common good by creating opportunities for all. Our focus is on education, income and health—the building blocks for a good quality of life and a strong community. Learn about the work that the national is doing in editorial article, Investing in education: United Way plays pivotal role in child development.
United Way of Southern Nevada unites our community to improve people’s lives. With the support of a committed group of strategic partners, they create bold and positive change for Southern Nevada’s most vulnerable populations through innovation, leadership and collaboration. Check out their recently released strategic plan for 2016-2021.
United Way of Northern Nevada and the Sierra and our community partners are working to develop long-term solutions in the areas of strengthening families, early learning and development, kindergarten readiness and early literacy, and early grade success.
 
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